Our Speakers!

Cassandra Salisbury

Cassandra Salisbury

Cassandra Salisbury currently works on the open source strategy team at Google as a developer relations program manager on the Go team. She is a core team member of GoBridge where she focuses on increasing diversity and mindfulness in the Go community. She is an organizer for the GoSF meetup, and a local conference, Gopherfest. Cassandra is an avid karaoke fan, finds relief in stress cooking and lives in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Go Stories

Anecdotal stories of success with Go by individuals, companies, and projects.

Ron Evans

Ron Evans

Ron Evans is an open source software developer, businessperson, author, speaker, iconoclast. Created @gocvio @gobotio @cylonjs @artooio @kidsruby Ringleader of @hybrid_group

Computer Vision Using Go And OpenCV 3

It is easier to see what comes next for the Internet of Things (IoT) when you have eyes on the world. Computer Vision (CV) software, in particular the open source OpenCV (http://opencv.org) has made big leaps in power and usability, and is ready to come into its own as a key part of an advanced IoT solution.

At the same time the Go programming language aka Golang has won over fans with clean code, high-performance, and portability. But there has not been any way to unlock the most state-of-the-art CV libraries using the most state-of-the-art programming language… until now.

Introducing GoCV (https://gocv.io) a new package for letting Go programmers create computer vision applications using OpenCV.

In this talk I will show how to use GoCV to build the next generation of computer vision applications, with live code demonstrations including a Tensorflow enabled drone.

Amy Chen

Amy Chen

Amy Chen is a systems software engineer at Heptio a company aimed at making Kubernetes easier to use. She is passionate about open source, containers, orchestration tools, Go, and salsa dancing. In her free time, Amy runs a youtube channel called Amy Codes where she talks about technical and non-technical aspects of being a software engineer. She aims to make the container and infrastructure industry more accessible by sharing her learning process and resources through video.

So You Wanna Work in Distributed Systems?

In a not so far off past, I was a confused college senior looking for full time opportunities. I knew that I didn’t want to work as a web developer anymore, but didn’t know which software niche I should dive into. Then Go came along and jumpstarted my early career into distributed systems.

Mat Ryer

Mat Ryer

Mat Ryer has been programming since age 6 (Mat would type BASIC code out from computer magazines with his father to make little programs and games), Mat has always had a keen obsession with programming. An early adopter of Go pre-v1, Mat fell in love with the philosophy behind the language, and has been an active member of the Go community since.

Mat is the author of Go Programming Blueprints: Second Edition, and a regular speaker at conferences around the world. He is an avid believer in open-source technology and founded some popular packages and projects including Testify, Moq, BitBar and various Machine Learning tools.

In early 2018, Mat co-founded Machine Box to provide Machine Learning capabilities to developers of all levels.

Things in Go I Never Use

Go has a lot of features that everybody learns when they are new to the language. After writing Go for over seven years (since r59 if you know what that is) I realised that there are a lot of those features that I never use, and don’t think you should worry about. This talk covers them and explains why. Drawing on a wealth of experience building real things in Go, this talk explores the theory vs the practice of Go, and aims to lighten the load of those learning the language. The more you know the better, but it’s better to learn things in the context of when you’re really trying to solve those problems, rather than all-at-once up-front with nothing real to pin it to. This talk will appeal to teachers of Go to prioritise the useful, so developers can be valuable sooner.

Jon Calhoun

Jon Calhoun

Jon Calhoun is the author of Web Development with Go, a book that teaches developers everything they need to know to build production-ready web applications using Go. In his spare time he also blogs about Go and teaches algorithms via screencasts and blog posts.

Building Gophercises

We often feel the need to learn a plethora of tech in order to create things in Go. JSON APIs, JS frontends, Docker, k8s, microservices, etc. In this talk Jon demonstrates how Go can be used to build smaller, simpler apps without getting bogged down by all the things you are supposed to do.

Christopher Biscardi

Christopher Biscardi

Christopher Biscardi works at Honeycomb, enabling engineers to leverage Observability in their applications. He previously built the UI team at Docker and the Design Systems team at Dropbox and has been working with Golang since being introduced to it at Docker. is an open source software developer, businessperson, author, speaker, iconoclast.

From JS to Go

JavaScript onboards a lot of engineers who go on to use it not only in browsers, but also serverside and in containerized applications. Go is a language that is extremely approachable to JavaScript developers and increasingly useful in containerized environments but many JS engineers don’t know that.

This talk will inspire JavaScript engineers to level up into Golang. We will compare common JavaScript idioms such as higher-order functions, callbacks, and modern ES* and stage-n syntax features to their idiomatic Golang equivalents and talk about why Golang is the best next step for JavaScript engineers looking to level up their server-side and CLI applications. Attendees will walk away with the knowledge they need to dive into, develop, and deploy Golang, given from a contrasting JavaScript perspective.

Kaylyn Gibilterra

Kaylyn Gibilterra

Kaylyn Gibilterra is a gopher from Capital One Labs and enthusiastic advocate for Go use in the enterprise. As a Recurse Center alum she would love to describe and share the joys of an engineering sabbatical. Kaylyn has also been a Women Who Code and Women Who Go Leader (feel free to ask about the difference!) where she has taught workshops and mentored dozens of engineers through their successful transitions into or promotions throughout tech. Most importantly, she loves history, rooftop views, and the color maroon.

Sorting and Searching alGOrithms

Go prides itself on simplicity. There are few areas of computer science that could welcome simplicity more than algorithms. Whether this is your first or fifth language, this talk will get you up to speed on development, tests, and benchmarking your sort and search algorithms - taught with gophers!

Anthony Starks

Anthony Starks

Anthony Starks has been using Go since its birth, and is the creator of SVGo, OpenVG wrapper, and deck, and he has a keen interest in design and visual communications, and because he is a programmer, he enjoys the act of creation, bringing together the art and the code. (think of channeling Picasso and Turing).

Go for Information Displays

Go is usually considered as a language for building back-end systems, but it is also suited for “programming pictures” – turning data into compelling displays and visualizations. This talk will explore this topic using three tools: SVGo, OpenVG library, and dec. Examples include with examples from sports, Go developer data, IT diagrams, flyers, stock data, persona views, time/weather/news, and general charting. The talk will provide an overview of the tools, show examples, and explain why Go a great language for this task.

Jonas

Jonas

My name is Jonas, I’m the Lead Engineer for the Content Platform at The Economist and a product of Midwestern comfort food, fantasy novels, and a love for complexity. After studying Political Theory, I found my passion in using technology to solve social problems. I’ve lead projects for organizations in Beijing, London, and New York, applying technology to diverse challenges such as mission impact evaluation, editorial transparency and trust, and online learning and collaboration. I thrive on engaging software architecture debates and working with animated, empowered teams (and coffee).

Happy Path to Go – Transitioning teams to Golang

You’ve been hired for an exciting new role where you’ll use Go for the first time. After your whirlwind week of training, guess what? You have to transition your team of engineers to Go. Good luck! This talk gives practical advice for building a learning culture that empowers engineers to master Go.

Steve Kaliski

Steve Kaliski

Steve Kaliski previously led API development at Beme, an app with over a million downloads. Prior to that he was CTO and co-founder of Bowery.io, a developer tools platform, and studied Mathematics at NYU. In his spare time he enjoys running and biking around the city.

How to Future-proof your Go API

Building and launching an API is great. Maintaining, not so much. I’ll review a number of popular API versioning patterns and their Go implementations, and show a migration-based approaching for maintaining and testing. If you have an a-version to API complexity, you won’t want to miss this.

Natalie Pistunovich

Natalie Pistunovich

Natalie Pistunovich is a learner, a Gopher, a public speaker and a sailor. She works as a Backend Developer at GrayMeta and the co-founder of GopherCon Iceland. Prior to that she was a co-founder at Connta, Nairobi, a Backend Developer at adjust, Berlin, and a Silicon Integration Engineer at Intel, Haifa. She graduated with a B.Sc. in Computer and Software Engineering from the Technion in Israel. In her free time she is co-leading the Berlin chapters of GDG Golang and Women Techmakers.

Using TensorFlow with Go

TensorFlow is an open-source software library for dataflow programming across a range of tasks, used for machine learning applications such as neural networks. Among the supported APIs, a Go API is available. Let’s see examples and talk about what can it do: what actions are supported, what’s in plan and how can this be used.

In this talk, Natalie will share her experience of using TensorFlow with Go in personal projects and at work - training and consuming models and discuss using Go rather than the default choice for ML - Python.